The Designers Gift List

December 1st, 2009


Lists of gift ideas from friends or family are great, but when you don’t get those lists, its always good to have gift ideas in your head. These are my ideas for you to give as gifts to your design friends or to put them on your own Christmas list or even sneak them into your own stocking.

Hit the jump to see the remaining items on the list. Feel free to chime in if you have any other gift ideas.


1. Lovebirds tea cups & saucer
When I first saw this, I was in love with it. I’m a huge fan of Si Scott’s work and this particular illustration is amazing. It comes packaged in a nicely designed box and includes an art print signed by Scott himself. If anyone wants to gift me one of these I won’t complain.

Price: $59


2. Tycho Coastal Brake

Scott has done it again. This new Tycho vinyl release has amazing artwork and four new stunning tracks. This would make for the perfect Christmas unwrapping background music. Quite possibly it could be a great stocking stuffer (depending on how much your stocking can stretch). This is a definite must give or get gift.

Price: $18

» CONTINUE READING THIS POST

Andrio Abero Designspiration

November 30th, 2009




I was sifting through holiday gift ideas and stumbled upon Andrio Abero’s work. These posters, my favorites, are some of his best. The typography and intermixing of detail within really sets the style and feel of these posters.

B+W Assorted Packaging

November 20th, 2009

wanken blog
wanken blog
wanken blog
wanken blog
wanken blog
wanken blog
wanken blog
on the wanken blog
wanken blog
on the wanken blog
Some wonderful black & white packaging designs from an unknown source. I wish salt sold in Seattle was packaged as beautifully.

Telepopmusik

November 19th, 2009

Telepopmusik on Wanken

Telepopmusik is a marvelous French electronic music trio. I was first introduced their music by the Robot Food Afterlame snowboard film as a kid and come to think of it, I think this movie itself has helped set my music preference to what it is today. There is a section in the beginning of the film that’s cut to the first track I’m listing, ‘Genetic World’. Ever since seeing this edit, I’ve always associated their music with snow even though the music doesn’t talk or involve it–must be a psychological thing. The second and third tracks, Dont Look Back and Mathematics, are two of my favorites followed by my third, Telepath Chromes DJA, a remix.

Telepopmusik – Genetic World

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Telepopmusik – Don’t Look Back

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Telepopmusik – 12 -p.-q=h-4p / Mathematics

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Telepopmusik – Telepath Chromes DJA Remix

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Power of the Sketch

November 16th, 2009

wanken shelby white sketch

wanken shelby white sketch

wanken shelby white sketch

The sketches above are a few of many pulled from two recent projects of mine. Just over a year ago, sketching concepts was one of my least favorite things to do. It seemed less time consuming to go straight to the computer to try and bring my concept to life. The truth was though, that it took two or three times longer to come up with my concepts than it would have taken to sketch by hand.

The reason it’s faster to sketch is because we can think faster from our brain to pencil than from our brain to computer. In a sense we can compare it to talking. An example would be that we use our voice to communicate; it’s far more effective than communicating digitally and there is little room for misunderstanding. This is my point exactly. Talking is natural and sketching is close to natural (the cavemen did it). When trying to use the computer to hash out our ideas, there seems to be a physical communication barrier that, no matter how good you are with computers, stunts your creative drive.

Being able to provide two or three-minute sketches to clients or the design firm you work for is a valuable asset, but only if you understand the principles of proportion, spacing (type), and ingenuity. In the sketches above, you can tell which ones were the 2-3 minute, 10 second, and 45-minute sketches. The 2-3 minute sketches are the ones you should focus on. The 10 second sketches don’t have the direction they need and the longer, 45-minute sketches are too timely (unless you’re creating an art piece). The 2-3 minute sketches help myself or my client envision the evolution of the project in the design phase. If I were to immediately show my client refined sketch, it may give them the impression that this is the final product. It’s also a safeguard to make sure you don’t spend too much time on an idea that may not be the best solution.

It’s funny sometimes what areas of a project get sketched the most. For example, the HH Annual Report project had more sketches about binding the book, than the design itself. Some of my other projects–a project for the Bicycle Alliance of Washington–started with word lists instead of sketches and eventually moved on to sketches of the photo-driven concepts.

Sketching has helped me spend less time staring endlessly at my monitor so I can spend more time making progress on my personal projects. Since I feel pretty strongly about the power of sketching, I’m curious to know what your thoughts on it. What is the balance between pencil and pixel in your work? Share with us.

Brooklyn Modern

November 14th, 2009

Brooklyn Modern on Wanken.com
Brooklyn Modern on Wanken.com
Brooklyn Modern on Wanken.com
Brooklyn Modern on Wanken.com
Brooklyn Modern on Wanken.com

This project is a 224 page, 8 x 10 hardcover book focusing on a collection of residential buildings in Brooklyn, New York. It was done by Project Projects, a New York design studio.

Songs For Singing + The Knife

November 11th, 2009


The Knife is one of those musical duos that never gets old. The duo is Olof Dreijer and Karin Dreijer Andersson. They are based in Stockholm, Sweden and have made music together since 1999. The most interesting part about The Knife is that their sound varies appreciably. On one hand you have fun, relaxing tracks and on the other you have deep, dark and mysteriously strange. I don’t plan on posting those tracks for the sake of maintaining this as a ‘Songs for Singing’ post.

The first track up is ‘Heartbeats’ followed by three others. For clarification, ‘Heartbeats’ was written by The Knife then later covered by fellow Swede José Gonzales. The Knife was at first concerned about letting José cover the song, but changed their minds upon the realization that the extra exposure could bring positivity to the label in the form of funding.

The Knife – Heartbeats from the Deep Cuts Album

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Knife – Girls’ Night Out from the Deep Cuts Album

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Knife – The Captain from the Silent Shout Album

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Knife – Pass This On from the Deep Cuts Album

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Bates Masi Architects Fire Island Tree House

November 7th, 2009





Wood interiors and exteriors seem to draw me in. When I was young, my brother and I would build tree forts and random wood structures throughout the woods. Now that I look back, it occurred to me that we had always built our forts a certain distance away from the house. More than likely it was an attempt at avoiding chores.

Did you ever have tree houses or forts as a kid?

Via Bates Masi Architects

NR2154: Stamp Design for Post Danmark

November 5th, 2009






NR2154 is an amazing multidisciplinary design studio established by Jacob Wildschiødtz and Troels Faber. This series of stamps mark the UN climate change conference in Copenhagen. It’s a shame that there isn’t more of a write-up for these pieces, but I believe its fair to say that this design speaks for itself. Also, I would have to say I’m a huge sucker for the Danish style, especially that of NR2154′s.

Expo Designspiration + Raoul Ortega

November 4th, 2009





The Seattle World Fairs and Century Expositions have been inspirations to me in the past, so when seeing this nicely done poster from Raoul Ortega, I couldn’t help but stop and read his post. Raoul’s use of the central ‘EXPO’ mark make this poster work very well.

See more pictures and his post here.

Your Most Important Data Isn’t Just Your Work

October 29th, 2009


Is it just me or does it take something negative happening to your files before realizing that you should have backed up your most important data? Not just your work, but your address book, iPhone, website, Email, etc. You can never be too safe. Just last week I went from 1,000+ images and full address book on my iPhone, to diddly-squat. It’s totally an inconvenience to lose that data and hundreds of contacts, but needless to say, I’ve learned my lesson.

Over the past few days I’ve begun my new system of backing up due to being paranoid over the idea of losing work. I purchased another LaCie Poultron 1TB drive from MacMall the other day to back up more data. They’re worthy, cheap drives and have a gorgeously sleek black casing. Other than the external backup drives, I’m also running three internal SATA drives inside of my MacPro Quad Core. Each drive in the machine is used for separate purposes. HD1, standing for harddrive #1 in slot 1, holds the main OS and applications along with immediate documents and fonts. HD2 is my Design Work hard drive holding all of my design work, both personal and client based. HD3 is my photo drive. All of my Aperture vaults and libraries are saved to this drive and then backed up on a weekly basis or just after shooting. I have all of my photos currently in an Aperture vault but also have the native RAW files backed up just in case.

In addition to backing up to hard drives, there are a few online businesses such as Mozy or BackBlaze that perform online backups. Instead of that route, there is also the option of backing up to your server, which I would only do if you trust it fully. I am working on online backups, but the process is slow due to the amount of data being transferred.

This data pinch has pushed me to refine my system of performing backups so I want to ask you–are you backing up? If so, how often do you perform backups? What are your methods/setups and have you run into trouble in the past with data loss? Share with us in the comments.

Heist Series: Austin + Los Angeles + Brooklyn

October 26th, 2009

Austin: A Shawn Lee Heist

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Los Angeles: A Shawn Lee Heist

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Brooklyn: A Beastie Boys Heist

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Today is the perfect day to introduce to you three of the finest new Heist’s from Brian Gossett’s collection. If you’re just tuning into the blog, the concept behind each of these mixes is that they’re literally heist related tunes from heist scenes in random movies. Each of the mixes is accompanied by great use of clean typography layered on fitting photography.

More of the Heist’s are available on Brian’s website.

Select page:
The end