Archive for October, 2011

Central America Tuscania House

October 16th, 2011



Architect José Roberto Paredes and his family live in this modern home in Central America. Traditionally the Spanish Colonial architecture has marked the lands of El Salvador, but this architect is working to change that. What particularly interests me about this house is the openness. Instead of being closed to the surrounding environment, the architect used large glass windows to relieve any barrier from inside to outside.

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Walstrom House by John Lautner

October 13th, 2011



John Lautner was a California based architect that built very inspiring public buildings and private residences. The Walstrom house was constructed in 1969 into the side of a hill in the Santa Monica mountains just outside of Los Angeles. My main interest in this home is of course the use of wood, but also the asymmetrical structure.

Photos by Jon Buono

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1980s Vintage Packaging Collection

October 12th, 2011




The 80s was an interesting time for packaging as it began to move into more complex graphics that were added to “help” sell the products. I’m not sure that more graphics helped move the product easier—people just like “new” things. I’m starting to wonder how far along down the line will products be immediately available to anyone. By that I mean, with instant meals you cook them there and then you have the meal to eat. At what point in time will we be able to ask for products and have them instantly compiled or delivered—essentially eliminating the shopping experience.

Found via The Flavor

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Unblur images in Photoshop Sneak Peak

October 11th, 2011

YouTube Preview ImageThis is impressive. I can’t even imagine the processing that gets done behind the scenes on a feature like this. This feature—though not promised in the new Photoshop spec—was demoed at the Adobe Max 2011 event hosted by Rain Wilson.

We’ve all seen hard-to-believe examples of photos being blown up and zoomed on shoes like CSI, but this would make a lot of that possible on a consumer level. I think this feature would be used quite a bit more than the previous “mind-blowing” Content-aware scaling.

Also, did you happen to see that the guys were sitting in Eames Lounge chairs?

Vintage Philiform Ephemera

October 10th, 2011



The sheer design of these mid-century Philiform packages makes me want to tear up. The visual weights between the typography and shapes were beautifully combined. You just don’t get these combos any more. I remember seeing a similar box growing up—could have been Philiform—but unfortunately it was too long ago to recover the full memory.

Make sure to continue reading for more and also share this great design.

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33rd Street Oceanside Malibu Residence

October 6th, 2011



Houses in Malibu are intriguing. To live that close to the ocean and hear the roar of the waves throughout the day while there is a perfectly lit sky above you for the majority of the year. It’s charming and it does pull you in like quicksand.

The architects Rockefeller Partners took the 420 sq. meter lot and designed the home accordingly. The contemporary design contrasts with the surrounding houses as if sitting amongst several ugly ducklings.

Shared via Fresh Home

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Steve Jobs Full Documentary

October 6th, 2011


http%3A//videos.bloomberg.com/66626118.flvWe all know just how much Steve Jobs has done for our industry. It’s a sad time to see him pass on. He and the Apple team have completely changed the world through inspiring and uniting all those who have, wish to have, or own Apple products. As a reminder of where we would be standing right now without the work of Apple, I’d like to share this full documentary with you.

The documentary was aired on Bloomberg in 2010 and is 48 minutes long and every minute is worth watching. Share this with those also using Apple products.

Invisibility cloak made of Carbon Nanotubes

October 5th, 2011


YouTube Preview ImageNow you see it, now you don’t. Two words, invisibility cloaks. We all could use them once in a while. Researchers have begun to use carbon nanotubes together to make objects seem to vanish. The same principle that causes mirages, also can be used to create an “invisibility cloak” similar to that of Harry Potter’s.

The way it works is when heat changes the air’s temperature and density, light will bend, allowing strange things to appear or in this case, disappear. Unfortunately the only downside here is that right now you’ll need to do all your sneaking around, underwater.

Menlo Park 2 Bar House

October 5th, 2011




Feldman Architecture designed this house for a family in Menlo Park, California. The goal of the house was to have a cost-conscious design and consistent from indoor to outdoor implementation of environmentally friendly materials. On the second story of the house, the space can be opened up by sliding slat doors.

Photos by Joe Fletcher

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Sainsburys Vintage Packaging

October 4th, 2011


Sainsbury’s was founded in 1869 and has become the third largest chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom. Sainsbury’s great in-house design team in the 60s and 70s produced these beautiful packaging samples.

If you get Creative Review, check out the September addition for an article about a new book by Fuel about the team and the approach behind the designs—buy the book here.

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Tycho Live Band 35mm Photography + Portland + Seattle

October 2nd, 2011




Over the last two months I’ve been shooting my Yashica T4 35mm exclusively. Something about about the very raw film and lack of manual exposure control on the camera really makes me never want to put it down. Since it’s pocket-sized, I’m able to cary it around daily. Shooting with it lately has challenged me to make sure I get the shot the first time.

This series of photographs I shot are of the Tycho live band. Some were taken at the Crown Room in Portland and then others at Bumbershoot in Seattle.

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