Archive for March, 2010

Life Series: One minute of footage takes two years to make

March 31st, 2010


http://tuvok.wimp.com/videos43ll/5f0ee5046182567fb4ff7a516231e506_minute.flvSo you know those time lapse sequences on the ever-so-amazing Planet Earth and the new LIFE series? This video, from the new LIFE series on BBC, shows how they make those epic time lapses. I’m still in awe every time I watch this video. The amount of room for error is huge here, yet they nail it perfectly. Ninety-five layers deep in what looked to be After Effects most certainly was difficult to work with.

The rigging that the crew used is also very cool. You can see in the video that they are shooting Nikon and using a large gliding dolly combined with an arm/crane to help with the fluid movement. They used a similar motion control setup when shooting the autumn mountain landscape, Japanese cherry blossoms in bloom and a sand storm in the Sahara (see them all here) the more well known of Planet Earth’s time lapses.

Video sourced from Wimp

Hipstamatic App Review Pt 2: The Results

March 29th, 2010

Hipstamatic on Wanken

Hipstamatic on Wanken

Hipstamatic on Wanken

Hipstamatic on Wanken

If you’re just tuning in to part 2 of the Hipstamatic iPhone camera app review, you can catch part 1 here. This set of photos is from this past week around Seattle. I used a combination of lenses and flashes to get the effects that I wanted. Once again, the best part about this app is that its fair unpredictable which leaves room for interesting results every time.

If you have photos taken with the Hipstamatic app, feel free to post your results in a link, in the comments. I would love to see how yours turn out.

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Hipstamatic App Review Pt 1: The Interface

March 29th, 2010

Hipstamatic on Wanken

Hipstamatic Loading screen: “Wiping off lens, please wait.”

The latest and greatest new iPhone app capturing attention is Hipstamatic. The name is a little corny (apparently the real Hipstamatic was a toy camera back in the 80′s), but the app is nowhere near it. Hipstamatic brings with it a sleek interface and unpredictability, combined with a cross-processed and traditional film looks to each photo you take.

The first thing you notice when opening up this application is that the interface is built around the design of the traditional Holga. I think this is very cool and pretty nicely done compared to other photo apps. On top of the design, the ease of use is great. To change lenses, flashes or film, it just takes the swipe of the finger. Purchasing more of the features is very simple as well, but I guess what app isn’t?

The best part about Hipstamatic is that it’s somewhat unpredictable. Especially when you forget how each lens, film, and flash affect the photo. At first I was surprised at how quickly it processed each photo and then saved it. I came to find out that it was because the photos that it was processing were only 480px or so wide and not the full resolution. There is a feature in the settings that can be turned on to “print” larger, but when turning this on the “developing” time is substantially longer. I was also pleasantly surprised at how closely–in some cases–this app mimicked cross-processed film. Of course it still has some work to do to even get close to cross-processed film.

So far I really haven’t had any issues with Hipstamatic to speak of besides enlarging the viewfinder window. I also noticed that my lens/flash/film combination kept on resetting when the app quit on me, two minor issues to a great iPhone application. Overall it’s worth your dollar ninety-nine, two thumbs up to the creator of Hipstamatic.

Continue reading to see more screen shot images of the interface. You can also see the photos I took for my review of Hipstamatic in part 2 here.

Hipstamatic on Wanken

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1970′s Traveller Series Games

March 26th, 2010

traveller series games on wanken

traveller series games on wanken

traveller series games on wanken

traveller series games on wanken

traveller series games on wanken

It’s funny how you stumble upon things online. I found these 1970′s Traveller Series games quite randomly and noticed how completely different the design was for games in the 70′s versus games now (ie. Life, Batman). Growing up I wasn’t that into games but I still do enjoy a good one from time to time. My favorites being Yahtzee, Zilch or even Polish Poker.

The work of Peter Seitz

March 25th, 2010






These pieces were created in the 1960’s by the graphic design pioneer Peter Seitz. It seems to me that Seitz’s work revolves a lot around forms (triangle, circle, square, line etc.). My favorite is the urban/regional studies institute piece. It uses an expressive intersection of shapes that really draws my eye in.

Images via Walker Art & Ryan Gerald.

Take Ivy Series Four Mix

March 22nd, 2010

Brian Gossett’s brings us his fourth installment of the Take Ivy series. If you’re just jumping into these mixes, the inspiration behind the Take Ivy series came from a group of photographs (also the ones used in the art) by T. Hayashida.

Take Ivy Series Four Mix – Brian Gossett/Since 78

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Rosen Residence by Craig Ellwood

March 19th, 2010

Rosen Residence on Wanken
Rosen Residence on Wanken
Rosen Residence on Wanken
Rosen Residence on Wanken
The Rosen Residence was designed by Craig Ellwood Associates for Gerald and Arlene Rosen. The house was constructed in West Los Angeles during the 1960′s. I really like the wood meets modern aesthetic throughout the house. Check out the Eames lounger and ottoman sitting in front of the old style piano.

Via the Mid-Century Modern Interiors pool.

Take Ivy Series Three Mix

March 17th, 2010

Take Ivy is Brian Gossett’s hottest new series of mixes. This mix, Series Four, is comprised of twenty-one different classical and contemporary tracks mixed together to make the experience feel seamless.

Not only is this mix amazing, but did you see the art? I was immediately drawn into it based purely on the detail of typography and the textures. The inspiration behind the Take Ivy series came from a group of photographs (also the ones used in the art) by T. Hayashida.

Take Ivy Series Three Mix – Brian Gossett/Since 78

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Vivienda 19 House

March 16th, 2010








The Vivienda 19 house is a beautiful house in Pozuelo de Alarcon, Madrid and was designed by A-cero Architects. The garage is located in the basement of the house, while the more important areas of the house such as the living and dining rooms are located on the first floor. All of the bedrooms and private rooms are on the third floor.

Via the Contemporist.

Swiss Poster Collection: 1971 to the present

March 15th, 2010

swiss poster
swiss poster
swiss poster
swiss poster
swiss poster
Cargegie Mellon University is the home to a very large Swiss Poster Collection. There are more than 300 works ranging from 1970 to present time. This collection was established by Swiss graphic designer Ruedi Ruegg and Professor Daniel Boyarski.

The Collection contains work by designers such as Max Bill, Paul Bruhwiler, Ruedi Kulling, Herbert Leupin, Josef Muller-Brockmann, Roger Pfund, Ruedi Ruegg, Niklaus Troxler, Wolfgang Weingart, Kurt Wirth, R. Schraivogel, Cornel Windlin, and many others.

Check out more posters and information on the Swiss Collections website.

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Wilt Chamberlain House On The Hill

March 12th, 2010

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wanken_wc_house2
wanken_wc_house3
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wanken_wc_house4
Until now I had never heard of Wilt Chamberlain the NBA basketball player or this enormous house. After reading a few articles about the house, the most interesting thing aside from the architecture and interior was that it has a groovy feel to it.

“Built in 1971, the five-bedroom, 7,158-square-foot contemporary-style house at 15216 Antelo Place in Bel-Air was built by Chamberlain, who lived there until his death in 1999. TV writers George Meyer and Maria Semple purchased the house from Chamberlain’s estate in 2002 for nearly $3 million, and have owned it ever since. The house has attracted much attention over the years–both with this listing and in 2000-2002, when Chamberlain’s estate was trying to unload it, first for $7.45 million and later reducing its asking price to $4.38 million. The house’s unconventional features include a gold-lined hot tub, a retractable mirrored ceiling above the master bed, a swimming pool that flows into the living room, walls of glass, 40-foot ceilings, a wrap-around pool, and a balcony suspended over the living room. Other features include five and a half baths and teak finishes.

The house sits on a 2.58-acre parcel that has ocean and city views.”

Source Mid Century Architecture

From the Weekend: Olympic Peninsula

March 8th, 2010









Sometimes I find it increasingly difficult to get away from working on stuff and take a break. This past weekend I managed to get away and go north from Seattle, out onto the Olympic Peninsula–all around fun trip. Excited to get out and start shooting more photos.

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