Author Archive

Vintage Graphics from the 1980s

November 27th, 2012



So much respect goes out to the illustrators of these graphics. The graphics appear to have been from a science-fiction magazine or album art, though I’m not sure exactly. The detail of each is quite amazing, particularly the first few. More on Flickr.

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Casa el Pangue by Elton + Leniz Architects

November 25th, 2012



Elton + Leniz is a diverse architecture firm based in Chile. Casa el Pangue is one of their stunning wood and cement projects. The home is very spacious and has a beautiful view overlooking the bay. Found via Contemporist.

Photography: Natalia Vial

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Instagram Shapes Series

November 16th, 2012








For the last month and a half I’ve been posting a series of found “shapes” on Instagram. The objects in the images are various places, signs, or vintage objects. Each image expresses my affection for simple, clean and effective design. It’s also about connecting with those lines; It’s about the feeling you get when viewing it.

It’s a challenge finding new compositions that really give off that spark, but it’s also fun. It’s also really interesting to see how others react to certain shapes and colors. Hope you enjoy!

View more from the series.

Avalon Hotel in Beverly Hills

November 11th, 2012



Last week I checked out the Avalon hotel in Beverly Hills. At first it seemed unlikely that the interior was nice because of the size and location, but the hotel had an amazing cool, mid-century vibe. The original architecture consisted of three buildings. Koning Eizenberg rennovated the building in 1990 to maintain historical style, but also make it a stylishly retro hotel. My favorite part about this hotel is the courtyard and amoeba shaped pool in the center.

Photos via inhabitat

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Chalet C7 in the Andes Mountains

October 29th, 2012



Chalet C7 is located in the Andes Mountains of Chile. The house is tucked into the slope to help blend it into the surrounding landscape. The home has two levels. The lower level includes the bedrooms and private spaces, and the second floor is a wonderful open view of the landscape and mountain lake.

via ArchDaily

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Sheats Goldstein Residence: Interview with James Goldstein

October 24th, 2012


John Lautner was one of the greatest architects. He designed this home back in the 70s in the hills outside of Los Angeles and eventually James Goldstein purchased it from the original owner. This glass walled home in the Hollywood Hills has been used many times in photoshoots and in movies. To live in this home would be extraordinary.

View more images of this house or of Lautner’s work.

Jurassic Park: The Evolution of the Raptor Suit

October 22nd, 2012



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Jurassic Park will forever be a classic. The people that put in all the hard work were doing things that had never been done before. One of which was to make a velociraptor move. Stan Winston Studio created a full raptor suit for SWS supervisor John Rosengrant to essentially wear in the film.

To determine how the suit should fit, the Winston team overlaid Raptor drawings on images of Rosengrant in various positions. The crew then did a body cast on him, and sculpted the Raptor form around that cast. Rosengrant then practiced for weeks on how to mimic the movements correctly. This is phenomenal.?

See more images on the SWS website.

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Burnt Out Stool by Kaspar Hamacher

October 21st, 2012



Kaspar Hamacher created these wonderful burnt out stools by setting smaller chunks of wood already on fire, on top of the cut stump. Continuously switching the criss-crossing pieces of wood allows for the burning pattern. Another method of doing this would be to cut out the stumps then burn only for a fraction of the time.

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Sagmeister & Walsh Renovated New York studio

October 15th, 2012





Here is a look at Sagmeister & Walsh’s New York studio. They recently renovated the whole space, turning it into a much more clean, minimal approach than they previously had. Photographs by Mario De Armas.

What Do You Want To Do?

October 11th, 2012


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What would you like to do if money was no object? It’s not a silly question, nor is it a falsified “what if” scenario. This question is posed for those wanting to leave behind the old notion of a “job” to do what they want to do. It’s a question for everyone really.

Now, if you’ve listened to the video and got the idea that the theme is “money is bad”, have another listen. In fact, remove money from the equation altogether. This idea is more than that. Allow the idea that you can do what you want to do, into your thinking and your mindset will change. Act upon this idea and you will better yourself.

It’s better to have a short life that is full of what you like doing, than a long life spent in a miserable way. – Alan Watts

Think past where you would be or what you would own. Focus on what would make you happiest. Do the things that make you antsy to wake up in the morning so you can do them. Do the things that you haven’t tried yet or are afraid to. Put aside the idea of money being your end point and focus on what fulfills you. If what you want to do is a risk, take the chance. More often than not it is the things we think we can’t do, that we actually can.

Omaha Beach House

October 10th, 2012



Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects is the Auckland based architectural firm that designed this awesome house in Omaha Beach in 2007. The part that I like most about this house is the expansive views out over the water and the large deck.

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USAF Project 1794 Flying Saucer Plans

October 7th, 2012




These are cutaway sketches of a 1950s design proposal for the USAF’s Project 1794. The purpose of this project was to build a supersonic flying saucer. According to documents alongside the project, the saucer was supposed to reach a top speed of “between Mach 3 and Mach 4, a ceiling of over 100,000 ft. and a maximum range with allowances of about 1,000 nautical miles”.

The cost of building the prototype was estimated at $3,168,000, but the military pulled the plug in 1960 after the saucer was unable to meet desired expectations.

Via Wired

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